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  • Interferon in AIDS: Too Much of a Good Thing

    Posted on May 12th, 2011 admin No comments

    Interferon and AIDS:  Too much of a good thing

    This discovery of interferon in AIDS

    AIDS was first recognized in 1981.  Interferon was found in the blood streams of people with AIDS later that same year, making it one of the earliest of the significant AIDS associated immunologic abnormalities to be noted.    Large amounts of interferon were found that were present for very prolonged periods, a situation noted before only in auto-immune diseases like lupus.

    The interesting story of how interferon came to be discovered in people with AIDS so early in the epidemic illustrates at least one way in which science can progress;  it also demonstrates a way in which scientific progress can be retarded.

    The production of interferon following viral infections is part of the innate immune response that is the immediate first line of defence against viral infections.   Interferon has potent antiviral activity against a broad range of viruses.  It also has widespread effects on the immune system as well as effects on other organ systems.  Some of these effects are harmful if prolonged, so there are mechanisms for turning off the interferon response after a few days as other antiviral mechanisms come into play.

    HIV and disease causing SIV infections differ from most viral infections in that the production of interferon is not turned off; it continues to be produced, sometimes at very high levels.  The prolonged presence of interferon contributes to the disease process and is a factor in the loss of CD 4 cells.

    The sustained activation of both innate and adaptive immune responses is now understood to be at the heart of AIDS pathogenesis.

    Interferon continues to be produced, sometimes in large amounts, in HIV infected individuals.  In untreated HIV disease we have the unusual situation where increasing amounts of interferon are associated with increased HIV replication.

    Interferon can’t be exerting much of an antiviral effect in HIV infected individuals, but this did not deter investigators from injecting yet more of it into people with AIDS early in the epidemic.

    This is even more puzzling as by 1983 we had evidence that interferon was able to suppress CD4 lymphocyte proliferation.  Long before this we knew that treatment with interferon was associated with low white blood cell counts, and a low white blood count is characteristic of advance HIV disease.

    But if interferon was of no use against HIV it has been spectacularly successful against Hepatitis C, curing many people of this infection.  It also may still have a place in treating some people whose Kaposi’s sarcoma is unresponsive to antiretroviral drugs, possibly through its ability to inhibit angiogenesis, which is the process of new blood vessel growth.

    Although there were lots of reasons to consider that prolonged exposure to high levels of interferon might have something to do with this newly recognized illness even in 1981, serious work on this possibility was delayed for many years.  The zeal to administer yet more interferon to treat AIDS is surely part of the reason for this neglect.

    The inexplicable enthusiasm to treat AIDS with interferon resulted in no benefit to patients; it probably accelerated the disease process in some.

    It also had the unfortunate effect of delaying research into interferon’s role in the pathogenesis of HIV disease.

    It’s only in the past ten years that we have gained some information on how prolonged exposure to interferon can contribute to the loss of CD 4 lymphocytes.

    Finding interferon in people with AIDS

    This is how we came to find interferon in people with AIDS so early in the epidemic.

    Early in 1981 I had referred one of my patients to Dr Joyce Wallace.  A biopsy taken of lesions seen in his stomach indicated that these were Kaposi’s sarcoma.   Joyce called to tell me that she had contacted the National Cancer Institute to help identify experts in New York City who were familiar with Kaposi’s sarcoma  because this was the first time she was confronted with this diagnosis (the first time for me as well).   She had been told that over twenty gay men had been diagnosed with Kaposi’s sarcoma and that Dr Alvin Friedman Kien at NYU was treating a number of them.  I knew Alvin through my association with Jan Vilcek, a long-time colleague in the field of interferon research.  Alvin is a dermatologist but also worked in the NYU lab that Jan headed.

    I immediately called Jan who confirmed that Alvin was treating a number of gay men with Kaposi’s sarcoma. Jan very kindly allowed me to work in his lab.  I then arranged my time so that I worked in the virology lab in the mornings and saw my patients in the afternoon.

    I was one of several scientists who thought it likely that cytomegalovirus (CMV) played a role in this newly recognized disease so initially my lab work centered on this virus.

    In the early months of the epidemic Alvin had sent blood samples to Pablo Rubenstein at the New York blood center for HLA typing.   HLA refers to the human leukocyte antigen system which allows the immune system to differentiate foreign antigens from self-antigens. It’s important in organ transplantation, where a match in HLA antigens between recipient and donor can prevent organ rejection.

    HLA typing is important in investigating a newly recognized disease as there is an association of certain HLA types with some diseases, even some infectious diseases.

    A serologic method was then used for HLA typing.  It depended on the attachment of HLA specific antibodies to HLA antigens on the surface of leukocytes.

    HLA typing of our first patients with Kaposi’s sarcoma proved to be difficult because the patient’s own antibodies were already coating the   surface of their leukocytes, interfering with the test.

    At the same time I had come across a preprint of a paper reporting an important observation by Jan Vilcek.  The CD3 antigen is present on the surface of T cells.  Jan had reported that an antibody against the CD3 antigen was a powerful inducer of gamma interferon.

    As I read this report it occurred to me that Pablo Rubenstein’s observation that antibodies were attached to our patient’s leukocytes could mean that these blood cells were secreting gamma interferon, which we might be able to detect in their sera.

    I discussed this possibility with Jan and Alvin and we immediately set out to test the sera of Alvin’s patients.  This idea was to bear fruit, but not what we had expected.    Rather than gamma interferon, large amounts of alpha interferon were found.

    Jan Vilcek has also described this event, which can be seen by clicking here.

    Maybe what’s important is to have a reasonable idea that can be tested, not that the idea need be correct.  In fact much later, using more sensitive tests gamma interferon was eventually found in AIDS sera.

    Robert Friedman is a colleague from the early days of interferon research, with whom I had published work on the mechanism of interferon’s antiviral action.  He was – and still is ,chairman of the pathology department at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda.  He, Jan and I have been colleagues since the 1960s when Alick Isaacs, a discoverer of interferon was still alive.   We joined forces to study the association of interferon with AIDS.

    Our extended findings including data obtained at both Jan Vilcek’s and Bob Friedman’s lab was published in the Journal of Infectious diseases in 1982.

    Since there were so many names, it was left to me to decide their order, and I chose that they be listed alphabetically. Thus Gene DeStefano became lead author. He was a technician in Jan’s lab and I believe he went on to become a dentist.  This is the title.

    Acid-Labile Human Leukocyte Interferon in Homosexual Men with Kaposi’s Sarcoma and Lymphadenopathy

    E. DeStefanoR. M. FriedmanA. E. Friedman-KienJ. J. GoedertD. Henriksen,O. T. PrebleJ.Sonnabend* and J.Vilček (1)

    This early discovery prompted a pretty obvious question:  could the sustained presence of interferon have anything to do with the pathogenesis of this newly recognized disease?  From what was then known about the effects of interferon it was a question that certainly needed to be explored.

    Although interferon had been discovered in 1957 through its antiviral properties, by the 1970s it was already known that it had widespread effects on the immune system.

    In the first few years of the epidemic I was in a position  to begin to begin to explore the possibility that interferon played a role in this newly recognized disease.

    I was able to obtain interferon assays on sera from my patients at Robert Friedman’s lab.   Further interferon tests were done by Mathide Krim, then head of the interferon lab at Memorial Sloan Kettering cancer center.

    I also was able to obtain quite extensive immunological tests on my patients through my collaboration with David Purtilo at the University of Nebraska in Omaha.    As a result I had (and still have) a small database of my own and so was able to produce further evidence for the association of high interferon levels with low CD4 counts, as well as some other associations with interferon. (2).

    The numbers of patients was not huge but the following graphic shows that 7 people with over 50 units of interferon/ml had under 50 CD4s, 12 people with 10-49  units had under 500 CD4s while 17 people without interferon had about 700.

    There are several other interesting correlations.  Interferon levels correlate with IgA levels and not surprisingly there is an inverse correlation between CD4 counts  and IgA levels.

    This was a CRIA presentation in the 1990s from the days when I was the medical director, but the data had first been presented in 1986.

    Being familiar with the adverse immunological effects of prolonged exposure to interferon I was puzzled by the attempts to conduct trials of alpha interferon to treat AIDS.  This is very different to the benefits of interferon in treating Hepatitis C and some cases of Kaposi’s sarcoma.

    The zeal to use interferon as a treatment for HIV disease created a strange situation concerning a molecule called beta-2 microglobulin (beta 2M).

    In the early  years of the epidemic various markers were sought that could act as prognostic indicators.   It was soon found that a raised beta 2M level in the serum of patients was an adverse prognostic indicator.   High levels were indicative of a poor prognosis.   But interferon is the major stimulus for the synthesis and release of beta 2M, something that was known in the 1970s.

    In fact the adverse prognostic significance of serum interferon had already been reported early in the epidemic.

    A 1991 paper by a noted AIDS researcher, reported studies undertaken to evaluate the hypothesis that elevated beta 2M levels were associated with the production of interferon.   But this association had been well known for about 20 years!

    Beta 2M levels can be elevated in certain conditions where interferon is not detectable. But even before the onset of the epidemic we knew that when interferon levels are elevated we expect to see increases in beta 2M.   Nonetheless this particular paper was noteworthy in that it discussed this association.   Few others papers dealing with beta-2M  during those years made any mention of it, thus avoiding the following question.   If elevated beta-2M levels indicated an adverse prognosis should we not be concerned that administering interferon will result in yet further increases in beta-2M?

    This of course doesn’t mean that beta-2M mediated any pathogenic effects, but it simply prompts a question.  Of course we now know that interferon mediates some of the pathological effects of HIV disease, and beta-2M can properly be regarded as a surrogate marker for interferon.

    How is it possible to explain why in a disease characterised by low CD 4 lymphocyte counts and the presence of large amounts of interferon, it was thought that injecting yet more interferon could possibly be of help?

    Dr Fauci and other investigators tried to explain the paradox of administering interferon to people who already had huge amounts of it in their blood stream by claiming that the endogenous interferon was different.   The difference referred to was that the AIDS associated interferon could be partially inactivated by acid, whereas the administered interferon was resistant to acid (3).

    But we knew that AIDS associated interferon was neutralized by monoclonal antibodies against administered interferon, meaning that the molecules were identical, and the interferon in patients’ blood had the antiviral activity expected of alpha interferon when tested in cell cultures.  It certainly was responsible for the beta 2M.

    In fact the sensitivity to acid is not a property of the interferon molecule but is conferred by other components.  Interferon from patients that is partially purified loses its sensitivity to acid.

    This explanation which cannot stand up to even the most cursory scrutiny was apparently good enough for community writers on AIDS treatment.

    I repeatedly tried to bring attention to the probable contribution of interferon to pathogenesis without success.  I received no response to a letter that can be seen by clicking   here.

    In 1990 I was able to organize a meeting to bring basic researchers and clinicians together to discuss the role of interferon in pathogenesis and in treatment.

    The meeting was very well attended, but I have no idea if it accelerated interest in interferon’s role in pathogenesis.

    I probably angered a number of investigators when I tried – with the help of Michael Callen and Richard Berkowitz to inform people of the risks of receiving very high doses of interferon in clinical trials. We felt that information about interferon should be included in the consent form.  We even went to the lengths of taking out a paid advertisement in the New York Native to inform people about potential problems associated with receiving high dose interferon. This can be seen here. Richard Berkowitz has posted the complete ad on his website, Richardberkowitz.com

    .

    .

    It’s now more difficult to undertake studies that can investigate correlations between endogenous interferon levels and various immunological abnormalities.  It would have to be done on material stored before AZT was introduced or on individuals not receiving antiretroviral drugs.

    The reason for this is that antiviral therapy promptly removes interferon from the circulation.  This is something that the group I worked with at Roosevelt hospital, including Elena Klein and Michael Lange found shortly after AZT was introduced.  We had access to sera from clinical trials of AZT.  In one of these trials AZT was administered for a week on alternate weeks.

    We found that interferon promptly disappeared during the week on AZT, only to reappear just as promptly when AZT was discontinued.

    Another report studying sera from the same trial looked at the effect of intermittent AZT therapy on beta 2M.  The same saw tooth response of beta 2M was unsurprisingly seen, but my recollection is that the word interferon was not mentioned.

    Undoubtedly researchers today are looking at the significance of this almost immediate turning on and off of the interferon response in pin pointing the mechanism of its induction.

    With continuous AZT therapy interferon remains suppressed for about 5 weeks and then reappears and increases steadily.  Interestingly HIV as measured by p24 antigen  reappears many weeks after interferon

    One interesting implication of the effect of AZT (and other antiretroviral drugs) on endogenous interferon levels relates to hepatitis C.  It’s been noted that in coinfected individuals starting anti HIV drugs, sometimes there is an increase in liver enzymes as well as an increase in hepatitis C RNA.  It’s possible that in some individuals, hepatitis C is controlled to some extent by endogenous interferon, and flares up when interferon is removed by the anti HIV drugs.  Some researchers have commented on this although I don’t know it this possibility has actually been studied.  There are also other reasons why liver enzymes can increase on starting anti HIV drugs.

    We presented these results at a meeting I organized in New York in 1990.

    The innate immune response is a first line of defence against infection coming into play within hours.  Secretion of interferon is an important part of this response which also includes the inflammatory response.  Innate immune responses are immediate attempts to localize and overcome infections.  These beneficial responses last for a brief period because they become harmful if prolonged.  There are mechanisms that turn them off.  But in HIV infection and in pathogenic SIV infections innate immune responses are not turned off.  Persistent immune activation involving the adaptive immune system as well is at the heart of HIV disease pathogenesis.

    Several important research questions that I’m sure are being pursued are:   Why is the interferon response not turned off in HIV disease?  Why does the innate immune response continue to be activated?   What are the mechanisms that normally turn off interferon production and why are they not working?

    The precise role of interferon in contributing to CD4 loss remains to be worked out, although several mechanisms by which this can occur have been elucidated.

    But for years there was almost no work on identifying what induced such high levels of interferon and on determining which cell produced it.   It took over twenty years since interferon was first identified in AIDS sera for work to be undertaken to identify the ways in which it contributes to pathogenesis. There is still much to be learned, and hopefully the findings can be translated into new therapeutic possibilities.

    The reasons why the role of interferon in pathogenesis has been neglected for so long are undoubtedly multiple and complex. But one reason for this neglect was surely the early enthusiasm to administer it as treatment.

    But many years have been  lost by the neglect of a critical line of research the importance of which was evident in the same year that AIDS first came to attention.

    I have chosen these three references from a growing literature to illustrate what we are beginning to learn about interferon’s role in the pathogenesis of HIV disease.

    1. Herbeuval JP, Shearer GM.  HIV-1 immunopathogenesis: How good interferon Turns Bad.Clinical Immunology (2007); 123920:121-128
    2. Boasso A,Hardy AW et al.  HIV-1 induced Type 1 interferon and Tryptophan Catabolism Drive T Cell Dysfunction Despite Phenotypic Activation. PLoS ONE  (2008); 3(8): e2961
    3. Stoddart CA, Keir ME et al.  IFN-α-induced upregulation of CCR5 leads to expanded HIV tropism in vivo, PLoS pathogens (2010); 6(2) e1000766

    (1)

    Abstract

    Some immunologic parameters in homosexual patients with Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) or unexplained lymphadenopathy resemble findings in patients with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Many patients with SLE have an unusual acid-labile form of human leukocyte interferon (HuIFN-α) in their serum. Sera from 91 homosexual men were tested for the presence of HuIFN. Of 27 patients with KS, 17 had significant titers of HuIFN in their serum. Ten of 35 patients with lymphadenopathy and three of four patients with other clinical symptoms also had circulating HuIFN. In contrast, only two of 25 apparently healthy subjects had serum HuIFN. All 32 samples of HuIFN had antiviral activity on resemble findings in patients with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Many patients with bovine cells, a characteristic of HuIFN-α, and all of 14 representative samples tested were neutralized by antibody to HuIFN-α. In addition, the HuIFN-α in six of eight representative patients was inactivated at pH 2 and therefore appears to Some immunologic parameters in homosexual patients with Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) or unexplained lymphadenopathy be similar to the HuIFN-α found in patients with SLE. These findings suggest that an autoimmune disorder may underly lymphadenopathy and KS in homosexual men.

    (2)

    Sonnabend J., Saadoun S., Griersen H., Krim M., Purtilo D.  Association of serum interferon with hematologic and immunologic parameters in homosexual men with AIDS and at risk for AIDS in New York City.

    2nd International Conference on AIDS Paris 1986.  Abstract 100

    There were several other interesting associations including a positive correlation between IgA and interferon, so needless to say, there is an inverse correlation between CD4 counts and IgA.   In the early days I used easily obtainable IgA measurements as an unproven  prognostic indicator.

    .

    (3)

    I found a transcript of a meeting in New York where Dr Fauci answered questions posed people with AIDS and their advocates, where he explains this.

    You can see this at the very end of another article I wrote about interferon and AIDS in 2009 that contains some of the same material in this blog.

    http://aidsperspective.net/blog/?p=118

  • Herpes Viruses and HIV: Some early History and a Bit about Safe Sex

    Posted on May 17th, 2009 admin 1 comment

    17th May, 2009

    [The relationship between herpes viruses and HIV disease is also discussed in a subsequent post:

    http://aidsperspective.net/blog/?p=520 ]

    The relationship between herpes simplex virus type 2 and HIV is in the news again.   This time the press reports are that while acyclovir failed to suppress transmission of HIV it did cause a 17% reduction in HIV disease progression.

    This reduction in disease progression was assessed by noting differences between the treated and placebo group in the numbers whose CD4 count dropped below 200, and who died.  A reduction in HIV viral load was also observed in those treated with acyclovir.

    The concept on which this study was based is absolutely solid.

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 is the most frequent cause of genital ulcers, and the presence of genital ulcers is associated with enhanced transmission of HIV.

    The failure of acyclovir to suppress HIV transmission is a disappointment, but the study should not be seen as a failure.

    There is no doubt that anti herpes drugs can suppress the recurrent herpes ulceration that some individuals experience. This was observed in the study.

    Herpes viruses – and not just herpes simplex virus,  have an impact on the course of HIV infection.  This study provides yet another demonstration that treating herpes virus infections has a beneficial effect on the course of HIV disease.

    Valtrex, a drug related to acyclovir was reported to reduce HIV viral loads in infected women in 2007.

    “Reduction of HIV-1 RNA Levels with Therapy to Suppress Herpes Simplex Virus” and it appeared in the New England Journal of medicine .

    (NEJM 2007  356:790)

    It is possible that the association of herpetic genital ulcers with HIV transmission is not as direct as generally assumed.  The reasonable suppositions included the possibility that the ulcers provided a portal of entry for HIV in the uninfected partner, that there was an accumulation of CD4 cells in the ulcer that provided a good target for HIV, or even that in the infecting partner HIV was present in greater concentrations in the ulcer.

    These assumptions about the reasons for increased HIV transmission may all be mistaken.

    We do know with some confidence that transmission of HIV is related to viral load in the infecting partner.  It may be that the assumptions outlined above derive from observing an increased frequency and duration of genital ulcers in individuals with higher viral loads who are therefore more infectious not by virtue of the ulcers.

    An individual with higher HIV viral loads  will more easily transmit the infection,  and also experience  more frequent recurrences  herpetic ulcers.  This of course only applies to HIV infected individuals.

    As far as individuals who are not HIV infected are concerned, a direct causative association between herpetic ulcers and HIV infection may also be spurious.

    Herpes simplex infections are ubiquitous but immunological mechanisms generally control the infection so that it remains latent and not manifested.

    Sometimes individuals know what provokes a recurrence.  Recurrences can be associated with febrile illnesses.  It is completely reasonable to suggest that the effects of some  intercurrent  infections may cause  both  herpetic recurrences and increase susceptibility to HIV.

    Whatever infection  causes the fever may also increase susceptibility to HIV, possibly by an association of the  infection with perturbed immunological function.    Transient immunological perturbations  can accompany many viral and tropical infections and so may not only disturb herpes simplex latency but also increase susceptibility to HIV.

    For some reason, interest in the relation of HIV to herpes viruses seems to have been almost completely confined to herpes simplex virus type 2.  At least regarding what is reported to the public.

    However the herpes virus family includes other members which have long been thought by some – including myself, to play an important role in HIV disease.

    Cytomegalovirus  (CMV) and the Epstein Barr virus (EBV) are perhaps the two that are most important.  These viruses are also sensitive to the anti herpes drugs used in these two trials.

    Since infections with CMV and EBV  are so widespread how can effects of acyclovir and Valtrex   on reducing  HIV viral loads be attributed to an effect of these drugs  on herpes simplex type2?

    I cannot recall that these two other members of the herpes virus family – or even a third, HHV6  were even mentioned in the papers demonstrating effects of acyclovir and Valtrex on HIV viral loads.

    It is entirely possible that suppression of  two viruses,  CMV and EBV, contributed, perhaps to the greatest extent,  to the anti HIV effects seen.

    One can only hope that sera from these studies were frozen and stored.  Such samples could provide information on an effect of these drugs t on EBV reactivation and on active CMV infections.

    As an historical comment, acyclovir was tried as a treatment for AIDS in 1987  around the time AZT was introduced.

    There were several studies of differing design over for some years from about 1987, some based on the hypothesis that CMV contributed to disease progression.

    AZT was tried with or without acyclovir, but the results were contradictory. Interestingly AZT also inhibits EBV replication.

    One study, ACTG 204, which compared two doses of acyclovir with Valtrex was stopped because 25% of those taking Valtrex died compared to 20% taking acyclovir.

    Some observational studies (including the MACS study) found that there was some survival benefit among those taking acyclovir.  Another retrospective observational study found no benefit.

    Nothing much can be made of these contradictory early results.

    But now, with newer techniques for measuring HIV activity by viral load assays, we   have very clear evidence that treating herpes virus infections has a beneficial effect on HIV infection.

    With the advent of the newer potent antiviral drugs, interest in anti- herpes drugs did wane, until there was a renewed interest in the past few years in connection with herpes simplex virus 2 and genital ulcer disease,  Unfortunately most of the  emphasis is on herpes simplex virus, when suppression of CMV and EBV may be as – or I believe,  of even greater importance.

    Actually there had been  interest in CMV and EBV in relation to AIDS from the time the disease was first reported in 1981.

    I have been involved in AIDS research and  treating patients with this disease from the time it started and so can  provide some historical perspective on the interest in herpes viruses,  that dates to the late 1970s, even before AIDS was described and long before HIV was discovered.   At this early time epidemiological studies on the prevalence of infection by CMV among sexually active gay men were undertaken in the US.

    As another historical interlude,  interest in herpes viruses also provided the basis for safer sex, as it is understood today.  As remarkable as this may seem, the first published and disseminated proposal to use condoms to prevent the transmission of AIDS had nothing to with HIV.   Condom use was proposed a few years before this virus was discovered, and had everything to do with herpes viruses, specifically CMV.

    From about 1978 I had the opportunity to observe and treat a very large number of men who were to be the first to succumb to this new disease.

    I knew that over 90 % of gay men attending a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases around that time had antibodies to CMV compared to 54% of heterosexual men.   By 1983  over 40% of a cohort of gay men in New York City carried CMV in their semen.   Amongst my patients, studies on EBV carried out by David Purtilo at the University of Nebraska showed an extraordinary high prevalence of reactivated EBV infections.  (Epstein Barr Virus and chronic lymphadenopathy in make homosexuals with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. H Lipscomb et al.  AIDS Research 1983 1: 59)

    At that time – 1981-1982, many of the patients I was taking care of experienced reactivated EBV infections as determined by serological methods,  and were excreting CMV in semen. Of course they were also infected with HIV , but this could not be known at that time.

    But from what was known about CMV and EBV it was reasonable to postulate that these viruses were somehow implicated in the disease.  It was thus possible to propose a way to at least prevent the sexual transmission of CMV.

    This formed the basis for the first published recommendations for condom use.

    With two of my patients, Michael Callen and Richard Berkowitz a booklet was written called “How to have sex in an epidemic: One approach”.

    The appropriate  title  was  coined by Richard.

    The twenty fifth anniversary of the publication of this booklet, that was essentially produced and widely distributed by four individuals, and funded by a single person, went almost completely unnoticed in 2007.    Although it is  in fact a landmark event in the history of the epidemic.

    Richard is only now receiving some acknowledgement for this life saving proposal  because a documentary film called Sex Positive has brought attention to  his achievement.

    An account of our collaboration in producing the safer sex guidelines can be seen by following this link.

    Safer sex recommendations.

    Michael Callen is remembered by many for his activism.   There is even a clinic in New York City named for him and Audre Lorde .

    I actually worked there as a physician for a short period, and with very few exceptions, the health care providers and others working there had no idea of who he was, let alone his contribution to safer sex.

    I just visited the Callen Lorde website, and indeed there is a photograph of Michael and of Audre Lorde with a few words about each, but no mention of Michaels contribution to safer sex.

    Thus herpes viruses, at least CMV had a role in the development of safer sex recommendations.

    As it turns out herpes viruses – CMV and EBV included, have a great deal to do with AIDS.    This is quite apart from their multiple clinical manifestations as opportunistic pathogens.  Both of these viruses almost definitely contribute to pathogenesis.

    Evidence that some herpes viruses can play a critical role in HIV disease progression has accumulated  for many years.

    In fact some evidence for this  was already apparent when AIDS was first described.

    This considerable body of evidence did not disappear with the discovery of HIV, but was relatively neglected.

    As work on HIV proceeded we gained some understanding of the ways in which herpes viruses can interact with HIV to accelerate disease progression, increase HIV infectivity and thus enhance its transmission.

    I should now describe some of the interactions that exist between herpes viruses, particularly CMV and EBV, and HIV.

    Many, perhaps most of these interactions also involve herpes simplex viruses types 1 and 2.

    The role of CMV in immune system activation, a major force in driving HIV infection.

    The systemic effects of CMV and EBV infections are most probably of great importance in this respect.

    Systemic effects resulting in immune system activation and activation of HIV replication may also  accompany reactivated herpes simplex virus infecteions.

    Among the systemic effects of active herpes virus infections are the secretion of pro inflammatory cytokines.  These circulate and attach to specific receptors on the cell surface. A consequence of this is that certain sequences on DNA will be activated resulting in the transcription of HIV DNA and ultimately the production of new HIV particles.  So, this is but one way in which an active herpes virus infections can promote the replication of HIV.  The general mechanisms are described in a previous post..

    An important and interesting  paper that also deals with   EBV and CMV in relation to HIV replication was published by V Appay and colleagues.  It can be seen  by clicking the following link.

    HIV ACTIVATION

    I am  reproducing some excerpts from Dr Appay’s paper here as the descriptions are very clear and there are references.  The references can be seen in the complete text seen by following the above link.

    “HIV-1 also causes immune activation and inflammation through indirect means. Antigenic stimulation during HIV-1 infection may be induced by other viruses, such as CMV and EBV”

    “In addition, inflammatory conditions occurring during HIV infection (eg release of proinflammatory cytokines) may also participate in

    the reactivation of latent forms of CMV and EBV. Recent studies have shown significant activation of EBV- and CMV-specific CD8+ T cells during HIV-1 acute infection [40,41] . Hence, sustained

    antigen mediated immune activation occurs in HIV-1-infected

    patients, which is due to HIV-1, but also to other viruses (and may be restricted to CMV and EBV)”.

    “CMV has been associated with strong and persistent expansions of T cell subsets that show characteristics of late differentiation and replicative exhaustion [94-96]. The anti-CMV response appears

    to monopolize a significant fraction of the whole T cell repertoire [97], so that it might compromise the response to other antigens by shrinking the remaining T cell repertoire and reducing T cell diversity. CMV infection is actually extremely common in HIV-1- infected individuals and its recurrent reactivation may put further stress on their immune resources. Interestingly, CMV-seropositive subjects generally experience more rapid HIV disease progression than CMV seronegative subjects [98]”.

    Herpes virus (including herpes simplex) infected cells express Fc receptors on their surface.  These receptors can bind certain sequences on antibody molecules. If these antibodies are attached to HIV, a portal for entry of HIV is provided on herpes infected cells that do not possess CD4 molecules on their surface. This process has in fact been demonstrated.

    Transactivation  of HIV by herpes viruses.

    In cells infected with both viruses herpes virus gene products can activate HIV and promote its replication. The transactivation is reciprocal as HIV can promote herpes virus replication.

    Acyclovir and Valtrex have no direct effect on HIV except under one unusual circumstance,  yet both have been demonstrated to reduce HIV viral loads.

    In the early 1980s when we had no effective measures against  this disease I treated my patients with high dose acyclovir.

    There then  was evidence, albeit theoretical and indirect for a role for these viruses in this new disease.

    In the absence of clear evidence from clinical studies, and given the gravity of the disease, it seemed completely appropriate to be guided by these theoretical considerations, particularly involving a drug that is so free of toxicity.

    But interestingly,  at that time,  none of these theoretical considerations placed much importance on HSV 2.

    The practice of medicine in those years, dealing with such a mysterious and deadly disorder of unknown causation , demanded responses that could only be based on one’s best judgment.

    Fortunately I also had had some experience in the transplant field and was also able to provide bactrim to my patients years before recommendations for its use were issued.

    But it was not until potent antiviral drugs became available that we were able to make significant and life saving, rather than life extending  interventions.

    What I have written of this experience with bactrim in the early years can be seen by following this LINK

    In the light of later evidence, I believe it is possible I was able to provide some small benefit in prescribing high dose acyclovir in those very early years.


    [i]   Acyclovir, when phosphate is added to it, acts like the nucleoside analogues active against HIV, drugs like AZT, D4T, 3TC etc.   But this drug has a truly remarkable quality.  The cellular enzyme that  adds phosphate to make drugs of this type active,  does not work on acyclovir as it does on AZT, 3TC and other anti HIV nucleoside analogues.   But an enzyme, thymidine kinase that is encoded by herpes viruses, and therefore only appears  in herpes virus infected cells  has the ability to add the phosphate group and turn acyclovir into an active drug.  This is the reason why acyclovir is such a safe drug.  It only disrupts DNA synthesis in herpes virus infected cells, where of course this effect is desirable; it has no effect on uninfected cells.

    However, if  the same  cell happens to be infected with HIV and a herpes virus, the herpes thymidine kinase will phosphorylate acyclovir, which now can work to  terminate  HIV DNA synthesis just as 3TC , AZT and similar drugs do when phosphorylated by the cellular enzyme.

    This effect , only observed in doubly infected cells in the laboratory is unlikely to be of much significance in the body.