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  • HIV disease and Positive feedback: An additional comment.

    Posted on August 31st, 2010 admin No comments

    HIV Disease and Positive Feedback.  An additional comment.

    A previous post focussed on the positive feedback interaction between HIV replication and immune activation.   HIV replication and immune activation reciprocally enhance each other.

    While HIV infection is an essential cause of the immune activation that’s characteristic of HIV disease, there are other factors that also contribute to it.   In that post as well as in the blog I write on the POZ magazine website, I described some of these additional factors that can add to immune activation.   As noted, viruses of the herpesvirus family, cytomegalovirus (CMV) in particular are the most important of these worldwide, while in parts of Africa certain endemic infections may be of great significance in contributing to immune activation.

    Since sustained immune activation, involving both innate and adaptive immunity is at the heart of the pathogenesis of HIV disease an understanding of how it is perpetuated is critical.

    Evidence for activation of innate immunity was noted in 1981, the year that AIDS was first reported, in the detection of large amounts of alpha interferon in the circulation of patients.  We even knew then that interferon alpha and gamma could  induce an enzyme, indole 2,3-dioxygenase  (IDO),  (IDO was known to be responsible for the inhibition of toxoplasma gondii by depletion of  tryptophan  in cells treated with gamma interferon) but we did not know then that this enzyme could contribute to the loss of T lymphocytes.   Another observation of historical interest is that even before AIDS was first reported in 1981, interferon was known to preferentially inhibit CD4 lymphocyte proliferation in mixed lymphocyte culture.

    Since immune activation and its effects, including  inflammation, are harmful if sustained,   there are mechanisms that can  dampen it.

    But in HIV disease, immune activation persists with continued deleterious consequences.

    The reason I’m revisiting this now is that there is a question that continues to be bothersome.

    HIV disease is not the only infection associated with long standing immune activation.

    Several endemic infections in Africa are also associated with sustained immune activation, certainly not all – some even have a dampening effect on immune responses. TB is another example of an infection associated with chronic immune activation.   In none of these conditions is there such a profound loss of CD4 lymphocytes as in HIV disease.  While individuals with active pulmonary  TB have been reported to have lower CD4 counts than healthy individuals, the numbers were well above 500.

    Is the difference between sustained immune activation associated with HIV and that associated with other chronic infections in HIV negative individuals a matter of degree – is it a quantitative difference?

    Could the  mechanisms that dampen and check  immune activation be impaired in HIV disease?   These mechanisms include the secretion of cytokines that have anti-inflammatory properties, such as IL-10, IL-13, and  TGF-beta, among others.  Specialized immune system cells can also dampen immune activation.  Tregs, a subset of T lymphocytes, have such a dampening effect.   Although there are conflicting reports on the relationship of Tregs to HIV disease, it is known that HIV targets some of  these particular T lymphocytes.

    This graphic comes from a previous post.

    In the diagram,  disease progression is represented by a circular  clockwise movement propelled by a positive feedback interaction between HIV replication and immune activation.   It can be accelerated by infections that contribute to immune activation, CMV in particular, but probably also  some endemic infections in parts of Africa.   CMV probably also has a positive feedback association with HIV in that it is more likely to be driven out of latency in the setting of HIV infection, and active CMV infections can enhance HIV replication by several mechanisms including their contribution to immune activation.   Some endemic infections probably also have analogous reciprocal interactions with HIV.    The influences that can slow the cycle are those mechanisms that dampen immune activation.   They include the effects of  Tregs, a subset of T cells with regulatory functions that  dampen immune responses, and the effects of cytokines with anti-inflammatory properties.

    In graphic terms, the speed of the clockwise circular movement will be the balance of forces that speed it up and those that slow it down.

    HIV disease progression is represented as moving clockwise in a circle, reinforced by sources of immune activation other than HIV and retarded by Tregs and other mechanisms that dampen immune responses.  Tregs  act as brakes, but HIV can directly make the brakes less effective.

    Could critical differences between HIV disease and other infectious causes of long standing immune activation where CD4 numbers are relatively preserved, be  the preferential targeting of Tregs by HIV and a different pattern of cytokine secretion?

    I wonder if this revised representation of HIV disease lends itself to a more formal modelling process.

    In this particular model a disease process is represented by a circular motion in a clockwise direction, with forces that both propel and retard it.  Some predictions can be made.

    The degree of immune activation at the time of HIV seroconversion would favour more rapid HIV disease progression.  The set point – the level from which CD4 lymphocytes decline following an acute HIV infection, would be lower, and the subsequent  rate of CD4 decline higher when HIV infection occurs in a person where there already is a higher degree of immune activation, compared to an individual where this is not the case.  There already is  some evidence in support of this possibility.

    It’s well established that HIV disease progresses more rapidly with increasing age.  Could an explanation for this be that immune activation increases with age – indeed, it’s been suggested that immune activation  contributes to the aging process.

    HIV disease progresses more rapidly in individuals with active TB.  CMV viremia was noted to carry an adverse prognostic significance in HIV disease very early in the epidemic.  There are but two  examples, but there are many more of  of a more rapid course of HIV disease in the setting of other  infections caused by bacteria, protozoa, viruses and helminthes.  Some are referred to in a previous post.

    Are Treg numbers at seroconversion and for a period immediately afterwards  related to subsequent disease progression?

    Could treatment with anti CMV agents during acute HIV infection retard subsequent disease progression?

    There already  is some evidence that treatment of HIV during acute infection might slow the subsequent course of HIV disease.

    The utility of any model of a disease process lies in its ability to provide a common explanation for disparate observations as well as to make predictions that can be tested by an analysis of available data or by experimentation.

    Viewing HIV disease as a process with a positive feedback interaction between HIV replication and immune activation with forces that both enhance and retard this interconnection,  provides a useful descriptive framework as well as testable predictions.

  • AIDS Pathogenesis: HIV disease has characteristics of positive feedback systems

    Posted on April 2nd, 2010 admin No comments

    There is a similar and slightly extended version of this post on the blog I have on the POZ website. It’s in two parts:

    Part 1

    Part 2

    HIV infection and many other infections caused by a wide variety of microorganisms have a mutually enhancing relationship that is characteristic of positive feedback systems.

    Although the reciprocal enhancing effects of HIV and other infections have been frequently described since the late 1980s, it is useful to explicitly recognize these as positive feedback systems as this highlights the implications they have for treatment of individuals and for control of the epidemic.  Explicitly recognizing the positive feedback characteristic of HIV disease also provides a way of looking at pathogenesis that can suggest further studies, both clinical and laboratory, that might advance our understanding of mechanisms of disease acquisition.

    This is an illustration of positive feedback.    A stimulates B which in turn stimulates A. In this way the effects of A and B are increased.

    The infections associated with the immunological disorders of HIV disease are generally, but not solely, caused by microorganisms that replicate within cells.     Many of the organisms that cause these infections survive in healthy people without causing disease, prevented from doing so by a competent immune system.   When the immune system fails these infectious agents start to divide.   They may then cause disease.  An additional effect of some of these active infections is to accelerate the replication of HIV.  Several mechanisms are responsible for this effect, which can then result in further immunological deterioration.

    In addition, co-infection with many of the pathogens that also affect individuals with intact immune systems can also promote HIV replication.

    Not all co- infections result in a more rapid progression of HIV disease.  Many have no effect and a few have even been reported to cause a temporary improvement of HIV disease.    This may be the case with measles, scrub typhus and a form of transfusion associated hepatitis.   But more often, when an effect of a co-infection has been noted, it has been to promote HIV disease progression.

    Different co-infections can therefore affect the course of HIV disease in different ways.  Some may have no impact on the course of HIV disease; a few may possibly cause a temporary amelioration.   Those that are able to accelerate it are highly prevalent in HIV infected individuals.

    Worldwide, viruses of the herpes family are probably the most important of the co-infections that interact with HIV in a mutually enhancing fashion. .    Virtually all adults are infected with some of these viruses that usually exist in a latent or dormant state.  They are readily activated in the setting of HIV infection and then promote further HIV replication by a number of different mechanisms.

    In developing nations a range of different endemic infections, depending on geography, may be just as important; many can also accelerate HIV disease progression.  Conversely, HIV infection can promote progression of some  endemic infections.

    Several different mechanisms have been uncovered that can explain the effects of co-infections on promoting HIV replication.    With such a wide range of infections, the precise ways in which each do this will vary in detail.

    However there is one characteristic possessed by all HIV potentiating infections.  This is their ability to add to the immune activation that is a feature of progressive HIV disease.

    By now I think it is generally accepted that chronic immune activation not only results from HIV infection but is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of HIV disease.   A state of sustained high level immune activation is the basis of the chronic inflammation and immunologic deterioration characteristic of progressive   HIV disease.

    But what exactly is immune activation?

    Immune activation refers to those changes that take place in the immune system when exposed to an infectious agent that allow it to eliminate or control the infection.  Essentially, the immune system is activated from a resting state to fight an infection.   Generally this process will last for days until the infection is overcome, and usually but not always, is followed by a lifelong immunity to the infectious agent.

    However in progressive HIV disease the immune system continues to be activated at a high level and it is this sustained immune activation that eventually results in disease.   An activated state of the immune system is characterized by differentiation of precursor immune system cells.  Differentiation is the process by which these cells develop specialized functions.   Examples of cells that have acquired specialized functions are those that produce specific antibodies, or those with the ability to kill other cells infected with specific microorganisms.   Proliferation of immune system cells is an important characteristic of an activated state.  This is usually a short-term response subsiding with control of the infection that stimulated it.  But in progressive HIV disease, proliferation is sustained, probably with episodic cycles of further accelerations, and this continued proliferation contributes to the loss of immune system cells.

    These cellular changes, differentiation and proliferation, are associated with the secretion of a variety of cytokines.  Cytokines are molecules that can change the behaviour of cells by binding to specific receptors on their surfaces, for example, causing them to divide.  Once released, cytokines not only attach to receptors on other cells but can also come back and attach to the receptors on the cell that produced it.

    The cytokines that are released   have widespread effects.  Importantly, they include those that are associated with inflammatory changes, – the pro-inflammatory cytokines.    With respect to positive feedback, pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6 and TNF alpha are able to accelerate HIV replication.

    A part of the immune system, the innate immune system, responds immediately to infection by recognizing molecular patterns common to different organisms.  The more familiar adaptive immune system responds to specific characteristics unique to each organism.

    The innate immune system is also activated in untreated HIV infection.   Interestingly effects of activation of innate immunity were recognized very early in the epidemic, even before HIV was discovered, and so are among the earliest recognized AIDS related immunological abnormalities.  Activated innate immunity is responsible for the large amounts of alpha interferon in the circulation of people with untreated HIV/AIDS, first noted in 1981, the year this disease first came to our attention[i].   At that time the origin of this endogenous interferon was not known.   For a period, elevated levels of beta 2- microglobulin were regarded as an adverse prognostic marker.  This molecule can be regarded as a surrogate marker for interferon.   The association of interferon with abnormalities characteristic of this disease – including low CD4 numbers was also reported in the first 2-3 years of the epidemic[ii].   Over twenty years later mechanisms have been discovered that can explain the participation of interferon in the disease process[iii].

    Interferon appearing in the circulation in untreated HIV disease may even be the first marker of immune activation noted, although not recognized as such when first observed

    The changes that occur on activation of the immune system are associated with many other markers that can be measured.    Different molecules appear on the surface of activated cells.  These can be detected and measured, as can the cytokines associated with immune activation.

    These measurements can tell us the extent of immune activation.   Importantly, the degree of immune activation parallels the rate of HIV disease progression.

    Although it is now accepted that the consequences of continued activation and proliferation of immune system cells contribute to the loss of CD4 cells and the development of disease, the precise way it does so is not yet known, although there  are a number of different mechanisms  that could account for it.  The   associated inflammation also has adverse effects beyond the immune system.   For more detailed information on these mechanisms there are references to two reviews at the end of this article[iv].

    Sustained immune activation is therefore at the heart of HIV/AIDS pathogenesis.   It is the sustained nature of the activated state that is critical.  Short lived states of immune activation are of course beneficial allowing us to recover from infections.  But in progressive HIV disease the process continues at variable rates.   Understanding what causes continued immune activation is central to an understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV disease.

    What causes Immune activation?

    While infection with HIV may start the process, other causes of immune activation are almost certainly also necessary to keep it going.

    The following all contribute:

    1:            The immune response to HIV itself.   This includes both innate and adaptive immune responses.  As noted above, adaptive responses are the familiar specific antibody and cell mediated responses that provide generally lifelong immunity to specific infectious agents.  Innate responses depend on recognition of molecular patterns common to several organisms.

    Some suggest that HIV contributes directly to immune activation through binding of some of its proteins to immune system cells.

    2:            Microbial products that can penetrate into the intestinal wall as a result of damage caused by HIV.  These microbial products then activate immune system cells.

    3:            Other infections.

    Some like active herpesvirus infections or the more traditional opportunistic infections can be seen as indirect effects of HIV infection.

    Others are infections that can cause disease in people with intact immune systems like the endemic infections in developing nations. Some of these can be more severe in the setting of HIV infection.

    Infections that can accelerate HIV replication include those caused by bacteria, viruses, protozoa and helminths.

    Those that promote HIV disease progression can  usefully be  described in three categories.

    A:            Herpes virus infections.   These are probably the most important worldwide.  Virtually 100% of adults are infected with some of them.     They represent infections that are more often latent, but are  readily activated  in HIV infected individuals.

    B:            Endemic infections caused by a variety of different microorganisms than promote HIV disease progression and HIV replication.   These are important in developing nations.

    C:            Other infections.  These include the opportunistic infections, as well as those that can affect people with intact immune systems.  TB may be the most important.  HIV infected individuals are much more susceptible to active TB infections than those who are HIV uninfected.  HIV transcriptional activity and viral loads have been noted to be higher in people with active TB.

    Here is a little more detail about these three classes of infection:

    A:  Herpesviruses.

    There are eight members of the herpesvirus family that can infect humans.   Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1, HSV-2) are perhaps the most familiar.  Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infect close to 100% of adults.   Varicella-Zoster virus (VZV) causes chicken pox on initial infection and shingles when reactivated. Of the three remaining human herpes viruses HHV-6, HHV-7, and HHV-8, the last is associated with Kaposi’s sarcoma.

    With all of the herpes viruses, once infected, individuals carry them for the rest of their lives, usually in a dormant or inactive state.  All can be periodically reactivated with or without symptoms.

    Humans and herpes viruses have co-existed for evolutionary periods and are well adapted to each other.   The immune system generally maintains these viruses in a latent sate so that they cause no harm.  Reactivation does occur periodically but is generally limited.  Virtually 100% of adults will carry some viruses of the herpesvirus family, usually in a dormant or latent state.

    The impaired immunity characteristic of HIV disease however results in reactivation of herpes virus infections. In progressive HIV disease these viruses become active and through a variety of mechanisms, including their contribution to immune activation, promote the replication of HIV.    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) may be the most important of the herpesviruses that promote HIV disease progression.  It can be part of a positive feedback system in its interactions with HIV.

    HIV → latent herpes infections  →active herpes infections → HIV

    It is not only through their contributions to immune activation that herpes viruses promote HIV replication.   In addition to the pro-inflammatory cytokines that have this effect, herpes virus gene products can directly activate HIV if a cell is infected with both viruses.  This process, called transactivation works both ways; HIV can also activate herpes viruses.

    In addition herpes infections cause a receptor (Fc) to appear on cell surfaces that allows HIV to enter it.  In this way cells that do not possess CD4 molecules can become infected with HIV.   Active CMV infections can also exert a mildly immunosuppressive effect.

    Herpesviruses, particularly CMV are singled out because they probably play a significant role in the pathogenesis of HIV disease.  CMV infections are so common that it is hard to find HIV infected individuals who are free from it so that they can be compared to those who are not.   But as early as 1991 this was done with HIV infected haemophiliac patients, when it was noted that those also infected with CMV had a much more rapid progression of their HIV disease[v].

    That CMV may play a role was suggested by many very early in the epidemic.  A multifactorial model for the development of this disease published in 1983 before HIV was discovered suggested a major role for CMV and EBV[vi].    The considerable evidence for a role for herpesviruses, particularly for CMV, did not disappear with the discovery of HIV.   The interactions of CMV and other herpes viruses with HIV that have been discovered may now explain their role.

    Large studies on the effects of acyclovir on the course of HIV infection have provided compelling evidence that active infection with these viruses can be regarded as part of the disease process for most HIV infected individuals.    Investigators focussed on HSV-2 undoubtedly because it is the most common cause of genital ulcers.   The dose of acyclovir used would also have suppressed  HSV-1, which is even more prevalent than HSV-2 and may be more sensitive to acyclovir.  HIV viral loads and the rate of HIV disease progression were reduced in individuals receiving acyclovir compared to those receiving placebo.  Although genital ulcer recurrences were suppressed by acyclovir, the drug had no effect on the transmission of HIV.

    The effects of acyclovir on HIV probably resulted from suppression of active herpes infection.  This is entirely consistent with a model that places HIV and herpesviruses in a positive feedback relationship.

    EBV and CMV are much more resistant to acyclovir than HSV-1 and 2.   But it cannot be excluded that this drug did not have some effect in also diminishing reactivations of CMV and EBV.   If samples from the trial have been stored appropriately, this can be looked at.  EBV reactivation patterns are easily recognized, CMV virus isolation is possible and even detection and quantification of activated T lymphocytes would tell us something.

    B:  Endemic infections:

    These are singled out because of their high prevalence in some parts of the developing world.

    These infections affect significant proportions of the population, they tend to be chronic and persist in the absence of treatment.    The specific infections will depend on geography and many are transmitted by insects.   Many of these can also accelerate   HIV disease progression, and some also progress more rapidly in the setting of HIV infection[vii].

    C:   Other infections:

    On an individual level, some episodic infections can promote HIV replication.   An acute febrile illness may increase HIV viral loads, but this is a transient effect lasting for the duration of the infection.

    Most of the serious opportunistic infections occur late in the course of HIV disease, and may promote even further disease progression.

    TB deserves special consideration because of its high prevalence in HIV infection.  Susceptibility to TB is increased even at higher CD4 levels. Active TB can then promote further HIV replication thus becoming a partner with HIV in a positive feedback interaction[viii].

    A role for immune activation in a positive feedback system:

    One way to look at the process of disease acquisition in HIV infection assigns a central role to immune activation.

    Immune activation not only results from HIV infection, it can also promote further replication of HIV.

    HIV replicates more efficiently in activated immune system cells.  Secondly, the pro-inflammatory cytokines that are associated with an activated immune system   can directly stimulate HIV replication.   Progressive HIV disease and immune activation are therefore components of a positive feedback system in this way.

    HIV disease → Immune activation → HIV disease → Immune activation

    The process starts with HIV infection, and is promoted by other infections , some of which are activated by HIV infection.

    Whatever is driving immune activation is driving HIV disease.

    The following diagram illustrates this.

    Looking at the course of HIV infection in this way has a number of implications.

    Pathogenesis.

    In the above diagram the course of HIV disease is represented by a self perpetuating cycle proceeding in a clockwise direction.

    In addition to the elements that have positive effects in driving the process, there will also be those that retard the cycle.  Two influences that will slow the cycle are the residual immunological control of HIV  infection, and those mechanisms that dampen immune activation.  Amongst the latter are the effects of a  subset of Tregs,  T cells with regulatory function, and the secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines.    Since sustained immune activation is harmful, there are mechanisms that can dampen it.     This is illustrated in the next diagram (edited from an earlier version ) which focuses for simplicity on those infections that add to immune activation and on processes that dampen it.    Of course there are other mitigating factors, for example, genetic factors conferring varying degrees of resistance resulting from receptor polymorphism.

    In the diagram, the connection of HIV with CMV and other herpes viruses is probably constant and indicated by a red arrow.   The connection of HIV with endemic and associated infections is indicated by a blue dotted line, because HIV infection does not increase susceptibility to all of them, nor does it accelerate the progression of all.

    [October 5,2010:  This illustration is one  redrawn  for a later post.  The added text is HERE.

    The positive feedback cycle starts with HIV infection.  At least some of the determinants of the rate of disease progression may be found in the conditions that exist at the time of initial infection that promote or retard the cycle.

    There is evidence that the degree of immune activation at the time of seroconversion predicts future disease progression.[ix] [x] It may also be an important determinant of what is called the set point.  This is the point following initial infection with HIV, from which CD4 numbers decline.

    The degree of immune activation at seroconversion thus influences the starting CD4 level; the rate of subsequent decline is influenced by the degree of immune activation  in a system where once started, conditions can exist where  immune activation increases with falling CD4 numbers, in a self perpetuating and accelerating fashion.   Whatever the outcome, it will be the balance of positive and negative influences.

    In the earliest years there were reports of EBV reactivation preceding HIV seroconversion[xi].

    I have not seen any follow up of this interesting report.   It at least suggests that there might even be   situations in which active herpes infections could sometimes promote seroconversion.  They certainly produce signals that can activate HIV transcription from proviral DNA.

    Treatment and prevention.

    The role of immune activation in driving HIV disease is generally accepted now.   There are sources of immune activation other than HIV and some of these can be controlled.

    Attempts to identify and control additional sources of immune activation may be critical in the fight against HIV/AIDS.

    Perhaps the most significant benefit in this respect concerns the developing world, where there are so many additional sources of immune activation. Even ascariasis, infestation with the common intestinal round worm is associated with significant immune activation.   Worldwide prevalence is estimated to be about one billion, with 173 million in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Many highly prevalent endemic infections can promote HIV replication.  Controlling these are perfectly appropriate targets in the fight against HIV/AIDS, and of course this would independently improve the lives of millions of individuals.

    Measures to control endemic infections include traditional public health interventions, such as the provision of sanitation and clean water and the control of insect vectors. Effective drugs are sometimes inexpensive.  Peter Hotez has written an article entitled “Africa’s 32 cent solution to AIDS”.[xii] This refers to the price of Praziquantel , effective in treating  schistosomiasis as a single dose.

    The lives of impoverished populations are ravaged and shortened by these infections. Many of these infections also interact with HIV to compound the devastation they cause.  Poverty, multiple endemic infections and HIV are intimately intertwined and in many instances reciprocally affect each other.

    Recent and ongoing studies will probably lead to the routine use of drugs that are effective against herpes virus infections.       Trials of valacyclovir to reduce HIV viral loads are in progress. Given the ubiquitous nature of herpes infections, the use of acyclovir as adjunctive therapy might be warranted even in the absence of recurrent herpetic ulcers.  Valacyclovir unfortunately is not yet available as a generic medication.

    Unfortunately EBV and CMV are much more resistant to these drugs.   The development of agents less toxic than valgancyclovir is important.   Valgancyclovir has already been shown to reduce immune activation in HIV infected individuals as measured by a reduction in activated CD8 lymphocytes.

    In summary it is useful to explicitly recognize the positive feedback interactions between HIV and other infections that can promote its replication, some of which are in turn promoted by HIV.    Control of the AIDS epidemic in Africa must include measures to prevent and treat multiple endemic infections that affect hundreds of millions of individuals.


    [i] This is of particular interest to me as I was involved in the discovery of large amounts of interferon in the circulation of people with HIV/AIDS in 1981, the year the disease was a first described.

    http://aidsperspective.net/articles/Interferon_Vilcek.pdf

    http://aidsperspective.net/blog/?p=118

    [ii] http://aidsperspective.net/articles/Interferon-AZT-1991.pdf Fig 1 shows CD4 counts in relation to serum interferon  . Presented 1986 at the 2nd international aids conference in Paris.

    [iii] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2491901/

    [iv] Immune activation and inflammation in HIV-1 infection:  causes and consequences.

    V.Appay and D. Sauce

    J.Pathol. 2008; 214: 231-241

    (This is an important  review)

    HIV immunopathogenesis and strategies for intervention.

    M. Cadogan and A Dalgleish

    Lancet Infectious diseases. 2008: 8: 675-84

    [v] http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119316871/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0

    [vi] http://aidsperspective.net/articles/NYAS.pdf

    [vii] Endemic infections in Africa have everything to do with HIV/AIDS:

    http://aidsperspective.net/blog/?p=403

    [viii]

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1905977/

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14551885?ordinalpos=1&itool=PPMCLayout.PPMCAppController.PPMCArticlePage.PPMCPubmedRA&linkpos=4

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12416451?ordinalpos=1&itool=PPMCLayout.PPMCAppController.PPMCArticlePage.PPMCPubmedRA&linkpos=5

    [ix] http://jvi.asm.org/cgi/content/full/81/16/8838?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=fig&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=1440&resourcetype=HWFIG

    [x]

    http://bloodjournal.hematologylibrary.org/cgi/content/full/104/4/942

    [xi]

    http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119342256/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0

    [xii] http://www.plosntds.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pntd.0000430

  • Endemic Infections in Africa have everything to do with HIV/AIDS and are a long neglected therapeutic target.

    Posted on June 6th, 2009 admin 1 comment

    An article with the striking title “Africa’s 32 Cents Solution for HIV/AIDS” was just published in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases.  It can be seen here:

    http://www.plosntds.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pntd.0000430

    This dramatic title refers to the cost of treatment of schistosomiasis with praziquantal.

    Schistosomiasis is an infection caused by parasitic worms, or helminths., of the genus  Schistosoma.    Most of the 200 million cases of schistosomiasis in the world occur in Africa.

    The species, Schistosoma haematobium is estimated to infect about 112 million people in sub Saharan Africa.  So its high prevalence puts it in the same class as that of TB, malaria and HIV.  It is responsible for a huge burden of morbidity particularly in children and young adults.

    S. haematobium  has a complicated life cycle, some of which takes place in snails.  People are infected by organisms released by snails living in fresh water. These organisms can penetrate the skin of any body part that is immersed in snail infested water.  S. haematobium affects the urinary tract.  The disease it causes is commonly called bilharzia.

    I was very conscious of its danger as a child growing up in Zimbabwe, with signs at several small lakes around Bulawayo warning one not to swim in them because of the danger of bilharzia.

    Peter Hotez and colleagues article is a welcome addition to the already substantial literature that strongly suggests that many endemic infections, not only with helminths, but also with bacteria, protozoa and viruses can increase the transmission of HIV and most probably  have a detrimental effect on the course of HIV infection.

    This paper concentrates on the local effects of S.haematobium on the female genital tract , where lesions caused by  schistosome egg deposition result in mucosal patches, that can bleed during sexual intercourse. The authors state “Presumably, the schistosome egg granulomas produce genital lesions and mucosal barrier breakdown to facilitate HIV viral entry” and go on to compare this to the process by which herpes simplex ulcers increase susceptibility to HIV.

    This does seem obvious – there is a mucosal break, so HIV has a way in.

    In fact in the case of herpes simplex, this seemingly obvious connection is probably not correct.   The large Partners in Prevention study, recently completed, found that acyclovir, a drug effective in treating herpes does not reduce the risk of HIV transmission.  The drug however was associated with a reduction in the number of recurrences of herpetic ulcerations, and significantly slowed HIV disease progression.  I have written about this in another post.

    As with herpes simplex, it is possible that systemic effects of schistosomiasis, may be much more significant, or at least as significant, as local effects in enhancing the transmission of HIV.    Of course, both local and systemic effects may play a role in enhancing HIV transmission.  The systemic effects include an impairment of virus specific immune responses; immune activation may also increase susceptibility to HIV and promote its replication.

    The influence of associated infections on the infectivity of HIV extends far beyond that of schistosomiasis.  Peter Hotez  (the lead author of the above article) has done a great service by bringing attention to a number of devastating neglected tropical diseases.  This important article can be seen in the Lancet of May 2nd, 2009, (Lancet 2009 373;1570-1575).

    The title of the article is:

    “Rescuing the bottom billion through control of neglected tropical diseases”

    By Peter J Hotez, Alan Fenwick, Lorenzo Savioli and David Molyneux

    I have copied this table from the above article:

    tropical

    These are incredibly huge numbers.

    Many of these infections occur in children and young adults and not only  have an impact on life expectancy, but significantly are the cause of chronic debility particularly in young people.

    Some also have an activating effect on HIV replication by several mechanisms, some of which  have been understood for well over ten years.  The resulting acceleration of HIV infection,  by  increasing  HIV viral loads,  as well as by other mechanisms increases the transmission of this virus.

    The health of hundreds of millions of individuals could be improved by efforts to prevent and treat these infections.  These infections are also appropriate therapeutic targets in the fight against HIV/AIDS.

    Despite a great deal of evidence for the interaction of multiple bacterial, viral, protozoal and helminthic infections and HIV,  this association has been inexplicably neglected in providing  additional approaches to controlling the epidemic..

    I had what might be described as a  misfortune to have been a member of President Mbeki’s panel on AIDS, an almost surreal experience I should write about.  The following is an excerpt from something I wrote for this panel almost 10 years ago:

    “The crucial difference in Africa, as opposed to the US, is the high prevalence of associated infections. These include STDs, TB, malaria and other protozoal infections, helminthic and bacterial  infections. Such infections would supply sustained signals, such as IL-1  IL-6 and TNF, known to activate HIV.  Some can also upregulate the expression of chemokine co receptors required for HIV entry.  Some of these infections are  somewhat immunosuppressive themselves, an effect contributed to by the secretion of IL-10.37 Sexual transmission of HIV is also known to be facilitated by a high viral burden.38 This would also be the consequence of the HIV activating effect of frequent associated infections in Africa.”

    This was almost 10 years ago, and since then literature has continued to accumulate documenting the detrimental interactions between HIV and multiple infectious agents.

    About two years ago I made a presentation at the Prevention Research Center at Berkeley, trying to understand why endemic diseases had been so neglected in our attempts to control AIDS, particularly in Africa.  I thought that part of the problem was poor interdisciplinary communication and understanding.   Specifically, there might be difficulties in   communications between public health experts and microbiologists.   Possible public health implications of the findings of microbiologists might not be perceived without additional explanation.  I illustrated this with a specific article.

    I used an excellent article to illustrate this problem.

    The article is called “Contribution of Immune Activation to the Pathogenesis and transmission of HIV type 1 infection” and the authors are Stephen Lawn, Salvatore Butera and Thomas Folks.   (Clinical Microbiology Reviews. Oct 2001 14; 753-777)

    This is part of what I said in California  in trying to illustrate the difficulty in communication:

    “Of great interest – because of its implications for disease control was the discovery that other infections, viral, bacterial, protozoal and helminthic, could influence the course of HIV disease.  Generally the effect was to enhance HIV replication, but a few seemed to ameliorate – at least temporarily, the course of infection.  Scrub typhus, measles and perhaps a form of viral hepatitis, may have a  transient beneficial effect on HIV disease, but these are exceptional cases. Most co-infections have the opposite effect.

    We now come to an example of observations made by microbiologists and work done at a molecular level with enormous implications for the control of AIDS in Africa.   This example is a review (cited above)  explaining in great technical detail how the replication of HIV can be enormously enhanced by concurrent endemic infections, and how this not only accelerates the progression of HIV disease, but also facilitates its transmission. The authors show in molecular detail how many viral, bacterial, protozoan and helminthic infections can affect HIV replication.  Included among these are common intestinal worms and water borne bacterial infections, causing severe diarrhea particularly in infants.  The discussion is largely concerned with the possible beneficial effect of drugs that might counteract this enhancement of HIV replication. There is one short sentence on public health interventions that might eliminate this problem altogether. It is of particular interest because of its brevity in a rather long article.   There is also a curious statement that where antiretroviral drugs are unavailable, measures to control endemic infections may be a useful approach.  This comment is reproduced below, and somehow ignores the significance of the implication that control of these endemic infections requires no other justification than as a measure to control AIDS.

    This paper, because of its immunological and molecular detail is not too likely to find its way to an epidemiologist or public health expert,  but for one trained in these technicalities, I would suppose the public health implications would be immediately evident.

    This particular paper also is a great illustration of the compartmentalization of information, and the difficulties of interdisciplinary communication.

    Below is an illustration from the body of the article: there is much more just like this.  A person with no training in molecular biology or virology would not be likely to spend any time with this illustration.

    lawn1

    However if one turned a few pages the following diagram may just be of some interest. But again this is unlikely.

    The part that would be of interest to a public health professional , if noted,  is contained in the large arrow at the bottom right of the illustration.  In this rather complex diagram it would be quite easy for the public health expert to be sufficiently distracted so that the bottom right hand corner would be easily missed.

    lawn21

    There is a long discussion, quite technical in nature, but at least the authors find space for the following brief comment.

    “Prevention and Treatment of Coinfections

    The widespread use of HAART in the treatment of HIV-

    infected persons in westernized countries has resulted in a

    phenomenal decrease in the incidence of opportunistic infec-

    tions and has greatly increased survival. For these individuals,

    the antiretroviral drugs are the major determinant of prognosis

    and the potential cofactor effect of opportunistic infections is

    now a more minor consideration. However, the vast majority

    (>95%) of the world’s HIV-infected people do not currently

    have access to antiretroviral drugs. Most of these people live in

    developing countries, where the quality and access to health

    care is often limited and where there is a high incidence of

    endemic infectious diseases such as malaria, TB, and infections

    by helminths and waterborne pathogens which may adversely

    affect HIV-1 disease progression. Prevention or early treat-

    ment of these diseases may therefore represent an important

    strategy in addressing the HIV-1 epidemic in developing coun-

    tries”. -

    In the above quotation, the authors are overoptimistic in their assertion that the cofactor effect of opportunistic infections is now a more minor consideration in developed countries.  Valacyclovir, a drug that inhibits the replication of  many members of the herpes virus group, but has no direct effect on HIV was reported to reduce HIV viral loads in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. In the developed world, active herpes virus infections are common in the setting of HIV infection, although most will be asymptomatic. For example, Cytomegalovirus, Epstein Barr Virus and Human herpes virus type 6 are not infrequently found to be active in HIV infected individuals. Valacyclovir will have an effect on these viruses, and may well find a place in the treatment of HIV infection in developed countries.  Indeed it may not be uncommon for experienced physicians here (in the US) to prescribe related anti herpes medications to their HIV infected patients. I certainly do.

    There is another aspect, a little more difficult to establish and perhaps altogether conjectural.  This is that we are presented with the question of why we need AIDS to justify interventions that have long been established to themselves improve the health of populations.  These include the provision of sanitation and clean water, the control of malaria and TB, and something as simple as getting rid of worms.  In the public’s assessment of the health needs of developing countries the information that is used is largely to be found in popular media, newspapers, magazines and TV.  Those who report in turn receive information from professional sources, and maybe it is here that the interdisciplinary barriers to communication I have been talking about have their effect. Thus the AIDS epidemic is perceived to be the greatest threat to the future of Africa, even though malaria kills more people, and common endemic infections contribute to an abysmal life expectancy.   (This was written 2-3 years ago and was probably incorrect even at that time;  estimates are that today there are  1.5-2 million deaths from AIDS in Africa, with close to 1 million deaths from malaria.  Malaria though  is responsible for a greater  number of deaths in children under 5 years of age).

    It continues to be remarkable that although evidence has existed for years that many of these infections can interact with HIV infection to increase its infectivity and accelerate disease progression, those who advocate for, and allocate funds to fight HIV/AIDS seem oblivious to the relevance and implications of these interactions.

    This effort of course needs absolutely no justification, but its funding is small compared to the resources that have been made available to combat HIV/AIDS –  but from all that has been described funding for these endemic infections is in fact also funding to fight HIV/AIDS “.

    Those were comments made 2-3 years ago.

    While malaria and tuberculosis are now receiving attention and are included with AIDS in some programs,   many other endemic infections  continue to be neglected.

    Going back much further in time,  interest in the activating effects of associated infections on HIV replication began within the first 10 years of the epidemic.  This started with the demonstration that proinflammatory cytokines, TNF alpha or IL 6, for example could greatly accelerate HIV replication.

    Of course these cytokines appear in the course of many different infections.  When viral load tests became available this effect was well understood by patients and physicians in N America and Europe. It became common wisdom that an HIV infected person who had a febrile illness, or had even received a flu vaccine  should delay viral load testing because the infection or vaccination was frequently associated with temporary rises in HIV viral loads.

    The implications for geographic areas where the infections were far from temporary seemed to escape notice.

    Thus endemic infections in Africa do have everything to do with HIV/AIDS.  There are numerous preventative and therapeutic measures available to control many of these infections,  and some are inexpensive.  Even something as simple as deworming may be useful.  Ascaris lumbricoides, the common intestinal round worm also is associated with immune activation and is easily got rid of.  There is a report that doing this with a drug called albendazole actually raised CD4 counts. (Walson JL et al. Albendazole treatment of HIV-1 and helminth co-infection: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. AIDS 22:1601-1609, 2008).

    The person who has been studying immune activation and the association of parasitic infestations and AIDS for the longest time is  Zvi Bentwich.   I can’t remember when his first  publication on this issue appeared but by the mid 1990s he was publishing on this association in Ethiopian immigrants to Israel.   Zvi Bentwich deserves the greatest credit for his early recognition of the importance of this association, its significance regarding immune activation and for his continuing contributions.   He pointed out the relevance of schistosomiasis to AIDS  (and TB) at least 10 years ago.

    The connection of so many endemic infections with AIDS  in Africa is also a connection of poverty with AIDS.  I saw an absurd and instantly forgettable paper entitled something like “Poverty does not cause AIDS” a few years ago.    Of course poverty is not the direct  cause of ascariasis,  schistosomiasis, tuberculosis, or any number of devastating infections.  Poverty is a very significant factor in  the acquisition of these infections, and as such can certainly be regarded as having a causative role.

    The lives of impoverished populations are ravaged and shortened by these infections. Many of these infections also interact with HIV to compound the devastation they cause.  Poverty, multiple endemic infections and HIV are intimately intertwined and in many instances reciprocally affect each other.  For example the debility associated with schistosomiasis has an impact on an individual’s productivity, with economic consequences not only for the individual but for the larger community.

    Controlling the AIDS epidemic in Africa must also include measures to prevent and treat the multiple endemic infections that affect hundreds of millions of individuals.

    To conclude this post I want to recommend a book published about four years ago by Eileen Stillwaggon, a professor of economics.  It is called “AIDS and the ecology of poverty” and is published by the Oxford University Press.